csheen
 
 
 
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  • First review
    May 20, 2014
  • Last review
    May 20, 2014
  • Featured reviews
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  • Average rating
    5
 
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  • Answer count
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    May 20, 2014
  • Last answer
    May 20, 2014
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csheen's Reviews
 
There's nothing fun about hot flashes, mood swings, memory loss and weight gain, until now.Menopause the Musical turns these aging woes into hilarious comedy with four wacky characters confessing their experiences with getting older to the tunes of popular '50s, '60s and '70s songs.The show, created by Jeanie Linders, debuted in 2001 and since then has been performed in 40 cities worldwide. In Las Vegas, the show has a rotating cast of eight different performers and two understudies.The show begins with the characters being drawn together by a lingerie sale at Bloomingdale's. At first the women get in a tiff over who has first dibs on a bra, but it's not long until they each realize that their heightened frustration is a mere result of the "change.""Are you from Iowa too?" gleefully asks the Iowa housewife."These days I'm from the state of confusion," replies the Earth mother before they all sing "change, change, change, change of life" to the tune of Aretha Franklin's "Chain of Fools." Their hilarious and unexpected lyric substitution stirs chuckles from the crowd as they begin to describe how their lives have been altered with age.While one woman sings, the others do ridiculous choreography in the background, which adds to the hilarity of the lyrics.Next, Miles, as the business professional, sings "I heard it through the grapevine, you no longer see 39" to the tune of Marvin Gaye's "I Heard it Through the Grapevine" while the soap star begrudgingly admits her real age.Throughout the show, the women take turns doing both solo and chorus numbers, proving that they all have talented voices to match their outstanding and energetic performances. Their characters each represent a different outlook on aging based on their personalities and life experience.Night sweats and hot flashes become the next topic of conversation."I remember throwing the towel over a different kind of wet spot," says the Iowa housewife as she fondly reminiscing about her younger and more sexually active years."Whether you're a sister or whether you're a mother you're stayin' awake," sings the Earth mother to the tune of the Bee Gees' "Stayin' Alive" when describing her issues with insomnia. Her impassioned singing and boisterous presence make everyone laugh.Hearing the familiar tunes from the past now integrated with lyrics from the present creates a funny and inspiring combination that makes everyone want to sing along.With each new conversation topic and song, the women stop on a different floor of the department store. Finally, they decide to take a break for lunch, and while discussing the menu, almost all of them get up to do a solo performance conveying their onset of a sudden hot flash. As they sing while trying to dab and fans themselves the audience erupts with laughter.Fortunately, for audience members the theater is kept nice and cool to avoid potentially experiencing your own "personal summer," but if you need reinforcements you can purchase one of the signature Menopause fans before the show starts for $1 with proceeds going to charity.The Platters' "The Great Pretender" becomes an anthem for an increasingly fading memory with age."I know your face, but your name's erased," sings the business professional while describing a common occurrence during her time in the office.Then the four women make a stop in the bathroom where the Iowa housewife frantically searches for her pills or "mother's little helpers" as she refers to them. After reluctantly admitting to the others that she is on medication they all reveal their own "little helper.""I wish we all could be sane and normal," sing all the women to the Beach Boys' "California Girls." They are an amusing and honest representation of real women also going through menopause from getting on Prozac to finding companionship with food. There's no topic off limits for these ladies.At one point in the show, Miles comes out dressed as Tina Turner to sing her own version of "What's Love Got to Do With it."  Her phenomenal voice fills the theater as she busts out a few of Turner's signature moves.For the finale, the women come out in sparkling black gowns and celebrate their sense of empowerment and acceptance of getting older while still being ready to get out and enjoy life. They even invite the audience to get on stage and join in the celebration with one last song.While you might wish you could skip the real menopause experience, this show is one that you will not want to miss. Just take it from one of the women in the audience, "everyone 50 and over should see this show!"-- By Caroline Fontein
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Customer avatar
fromboulder city, nv
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Female
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Travel Companions:Friends
Purchase Frequency:More than 6 times a year
Yes, I recommend this product.
hillerious
PostedMay 20, 2014
we had great seats, great little theatre and the show was suberb!!
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0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
csheen's Questions
 
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csheen's Answers
 
You have probably seen him on television performing incredible illusions such as making the Statue of Liberty disappear, navigating the rapids of Niagara Falls and flying over the Grand Canyon. Master magician David Copperfield seems to have done it all. His show in Las Vegas is a unique opportunity for audiences to see these larger-than- life illusions performed live and up close in the Hollywood Theater at MGM Grand.Of course he can't exactly re-create all of them, but he demonstrates similar and equally amazing illusions using objects that are more suitable for a stage setting.Copperfield alludes to an illusion he did where he walked through the Great Wall of China and then explains that he is going to re-create that same illusion using a large metal sheet as the indestructible medium through which he will effortlessly pass.The metal sheet is placed on a raised platform, and Copperfield has two audience members come on stage to test it out by walking on it and hitting it with a rubber hammer.Next, he lies under the piece of metal, and four assistants hold a sheet over Copperfield and the platform. The assistants spin the platform around proving to the audience that there is no way out except by going through the metal. First you see just a finger poking through and then, within seconds, he miraculously appears on top of the metal sheet.This is just one of the mind-boggling magic tricks that he performs in the show. As the epitome of master magicians, Copperfield takes his illusions to another level of excitement and awe. Instead of doing the typical box trick where a woman is sliced in half, he locks himself in a box that begins to shrink in size. He smiles at the audience while moving his hands and feet as the box gets so small the entire length of his body has been reduced to mere inches.The box gradually gets bigger and Copperfield hops onto the stage saying, "that's how they made mini me," before moving on to his next illusion. He integrates his casual and comical personality into every act, resulting in laughter from the crowd.Audience interaction is a big part of the show as he incorporates a person picked at random for almost every illusion. You might even see him doing magic right in front of your seat when he performs illusions while standing in the audience. For one illusion he asks a woman to join him in the aisle on the side of the theater. He asks the woman to examine a piece of tissue paper before he rolls it into a ball and makes it levitate and dance along his arm with the tap of a finger.Unlike other magic shows in Las Vegas, Copperfield does not implement flashy showgirls, dancing or over the top production elements to supplement his illusions. His magic has enough of a wow factor on its own.His expertise as a magician dates back to when he was just 12 years old and started performing professionally. That same year he also became the youngest person ever to be admitted to the Society of American Magicians. From there, Copperfield went on to teach a course on magic at New York University when he was 16.During his first year in college, Copperfield starred in the Chicago musical, "The Magic Man," and as a result of the show's success he was selected to host ABC's "The Magic of ABC." From there he was offered his own series of specials with CBS titled "The Magic of David Copperfield." The series has been aired in over 40 countries.His illustrious career has made him a Guinness Book of World Record holder for having 21 Emmys, and he has a star on the Hollywood "Walk of Fame." Apart from his revue in Vegas, he continues to tour, performing sold out shows around the world.His enduring presence as a magician and integration into pop culture and even postage stamps proves that Copperfield's magic has no boundaries.He even demonstrates his ability to predict the future in an act where he gets people from the audience to provide him with different numbers that he later pulls from a box that has been hanging above the stage for the entire show.If just having the numbers on paper is not impressive enough, Copperfield also reveals a cassette tape with a recording of himself reciting the numbers that he plays for the audience. It is an astonishing feat that amazes everyone with the impossibility of it all.-- By Caroline Fontein
 

I bought 2 tickets "category 1 reserved seating". What´s meaning?

What is the location in the thatre?
i'm not exactly sure except i had category 1 seats and they were EXCELLENT...not the first row but about 4 back...perfect spot to see the entire stage. i will tell you that this venue is smaller and there really is NOT a bad seat in the house. i made attention to that and honestly we couldn't find one bad seat. sit back, relax and enjoy the show!!
5 months ago
Customer avatar
by
csheen
boulder city, nv
 
You have probably seen him on television performing incredible illusions such as making the Statue of Liberty disappear, navigating the rapids of Niagara Falls and flying over the Grand Canyon. Master magician David Copperfield seems to have done it all. His show in Las Vegas is a unique opportunity for audiences to see these larger-than- life illusions performed live and up close in the Hollywood Theater at MGM Grand.Of course he can't exactly re-create all of them, but he demonstrates similar and equally amazing illusions using objects that are more suitable for a stage setting.Copperfield alludes to an illusion he did where he walked through the Great Wall of China and then explains that he is going to re-create that same illusion using a large metal sheet as the indestructible medium through which he will effortlessly pass.The metal sheet is placed on a raised platform, and Copperfield has two audience members come on stage to test it out by walking on it and hitting it with a rubber hammer.Next, he lies under the piece of metal, and four assistants hold a sheet over Copperfield and the platform. The assistants spin the platform around proving to the audience that there is no way out except by going through the metal. First you see just a finger poking through and then, within seconds, he miraculously appears on top of the metal sheet.This is just one of the mind-boggling magic tricks that he performs in the show. As the epitome of master magicians, Copperfield takes his illusions to another level of excitement and awe. Instead of doing the typical box trick where a woman is sliced in half, he locks himself in a box that begins to shrink in size. He smiles at the audience while moving his hands and feet as the box gets so small the entire length of his body has been reduced to mere inches.The box gradually gets bigger and Copperfield hops onto the stage saying, "that's how they made mini me," before moving on to his next illusion. He integrates his casual and comical personality into every act, resulting in laughter from the crowd.Audience interaction is a big part of the show as he incorporates a person picked at random for almost every illusion. You might even see him doing magic right in front of your seat when he performs illusions while standing in the audience. For one illusion he asks a woman to join him in the aisle on the side of the theater. He asks the woman to examine a piece of tissue paper before he rolls it into a ball and makes it levitate and dance along his arm with the tap of a finger.Unlike other magic shows in Las Vegas, Copperfield does not implement flashy showgirls, dancing or over the top production elements to supplement his illusions. His magic has enough of a wow factor on its own.His expertise as a magician dates back to when he was just 12 years old and started performing professionally. That same year he also became the youngest person ever to be admitted to the Society of American Magicians. From there, Copperfield went on to teach a course on magic at New York University when he was 16.During his first year in college, Copperfield starred in the Chicago musical, "The Magic Man," and as a result of the show's success he was selected to host ABC's "The Magic of ABC." From there he was offered his own series of specials with CBS titled "The Magic of David Copperfield." The series has been aired in over 40 countries.His illustrious career has made him a Guinness Book of World Record holder for having 21 Emmys, and he has a star on the Hollywood "Walk of Fame." Apart from his revue in Vegas, he continues to tour, performing sold out shows around the world.His enduring presence as a magician and integration into pop culture and even postage stamps proves that Copperfield's magic has no boundaries.He even demonstrates his ability to predict the future in an act where he gets people from the audience to provide him with different numbers that he later pulls from a box that has been hanging above the stage for the entire show.If just having the numbers on paper is not impressive enough, Copperfield also reveals a cassette tape with a recording of himself reciting the numbers that he plays for the audience. It is an astonishing feat that amazes everyone with the impossibility of it all.-- By Caroline Fontein
 

So, when assigned seats?

if you are asking about assigned seating. if you go through vegas.com you don't get a seat until you pick up your tickets however you can get tickets via mgm grande's website and get assigned seats for his shows. there are other venue's to get tickets with assigned seats.
5 months ago
Customer avatar
by
csheen
boulder city, nv
 
You have probably seen him on television performing incredible illusions such as making the Statue of Liberty disappear, navigating the rapids of Niagara Falls and flying over the Grand Canyon. Master magician David Copperfield seems to have done it all. His show in Las Vegas is a unique opportunity for audiences to see these larger-than- life illusions performed live and up close in the Hollywood Theater at MGM Grand.Of course he can't exactly re-create all of them, but he demonstrates similar and equally amazing illusions using objects that are more suitable for a stage setting.Copperfield alludes to an illusion he did where he walked through the Great Wall of China and then explains that he is going to re-create that same illusion using a large metal sheet as the indestructible medium through which he will effortlessly pass.The metal sheet is placed on a raised platform, and Copperfield has two audience members come on stage to test it out by walking on it and hitting it with a rubber hammer.Next, he lies under the piece of metal, and four assistants hold a sheet over Copperfield and the platform. The assistants spin the platform around proving to the audience that there is no way out except by going through the metal. First you see just a finger poking through and then, within seconds, he miraculously appears on top of the metal sheet.This is just one of the mind-boggling magic tricks that he performs in the show. As the epitome of master magicians, Copperfield takes his illusions to another level of excitement and awe. Instead of doing the typical box trick where a woman is sliced in half, he locks himself in a box that begins to shrink in size. He smiles at the audience while moving his hands and feet as the box gets so small the entire length of his body has been reduced to mere inches.The box gradually gets bigger and Copperfield hops onto the stage saying, "that's how they made mini me," before moving on to his next illusion. He integrates his casual and comical personality into every act, resulting in laughter from the crowd.Audience interaction is a big part of the show as he incorporates a person picked at random for almost every illusion. You might even see him doing magic right in front of your seat when he performs illusions while standing in the audience. For one illusion he asks a woman to join him in the aisle on the side of the theater. He asks the woman to examine a piece of tissue paper before he rolls it into a ball and makes it levitate and dance along his arm with the tap of a finger.Unlike other magic shows in Las Vegas, Copperfield does not implement flashy showgirls, dancing or over the top production elements to supplement his illusions. His magic has enough of a wow factor on its own.His expertise as a magician dates back to when he was just 12 years old and started performing professionally. That same year he also became the youngest person ever to be admitted to the Society of American Magicians. From there, Copperfield went on to teach a course on magic at New York University when he was 16.During his first year in college, Copperfield starred in the Chicago musical, "The Magic Man," and as a result of the show's success he was selected to host ABC's "The Magic of ABC." From there he was offered his own series of specials with CBS titled "The Magic of David Copperfield." The series has been aired in over 40 countries.His illustrious career has made him a Guinness Book of World Record holder for having 21 Emmys, and he has a star on the Hollywood "Walk of Fame." Apart from his revue in Vegas, he continues to tour, performing sold out shows around the world.His enduring presence as a magician and integration into pop culture and even postage stamps proves that Copperfield's magic has no boundaries.He even demonstrates his ability to predict the future in an act where he gets people from the audience to provide him with different numbers that he later pulls from a box that has been hanging above the stage for the entire show.If just having the numbers on paper is not impressive enough, Copperfield also reveals a cassette tape with a recording of himself reciting the numbers that he plays for the audience. It is an astonishing feat that amazes everyone with the impossibility of it all.-- By Caroline Fontein
 

How often David change his performance, I see him in may and I wanted to see him again in march if is a new show

im not sure how often he changes his performance however i will tell you that he said that he was showing several different/for the first time "tricks" at our show and would be showing them moving forward. he would tell us at the end of the trick..."this was new tonight, hope you liked it" he was absolutely excellent!!! so friendly, LOTS of audience participation and heartwarming part involving his father!
5 months ago
Customer avatar
by
csheen
boulder city, nv