MileHighGuy
 
 
 
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    January 1, 2014
  • Last review
    January 1, 2014
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    4
 
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    January 1, 2014
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MileHighGuy's Reviews
 
There are some basic rules of magic. Never tell your audience how a trick is done. Don't show the audience the preparation for a trick. And never, ever perform the classic cups and balls trick with transparent cups.Penn & Teller manage to break all of these rules and more in their show at the Rio Hotel and Casino.Penn & Teller's edgy show is unlike any other magic production in Las Vegas. The tall, lanky Penn serves as a narrator, providing a running comedic commentary on just about everything they do, while the diminutive Teller provides a lot of the show's action, all without saying a single word. The pair manages to reveal a few tricks of their trade along the way, while turning around and completely stumping you with others.Penn & Teller take some of the mystery out of the aforementioned cups and balls trick - a standard magic act where a magician makes balls pass through the solid bottoms of the cups, jump from one cup to another, or disappear from the cup and appear in other places. They perform the act with see-through plastic cups, allowing the audience to see exactly how it works...or do they? Part of the joke is that during the explanation, they do the trick so quickly, that it makes it pretty difficult to follow.Penn & Teller's show relies heavily on audience interaction. Several audience members are chosen to come up and be part of some tricks and to help confirm the authenticity of others. In one vignette, the trick is actually played on the volunteer while the audience gets to watch. The volunteer is blindfolded while Penn pretends to throw knives at her. Then, again blindfolded, she is tricked into believing she throws knives at Penn.While the audience does get to see behind the scenes during these parts of the show, other tricks the duo performs leave viewers completely mystified. Penn takes the eyeglasses from an audience member and puts them in his pocket. They somehow disappear from his pocket and end up inexplicably on Teller's face, which has been encased in a wooden box the whole time.Teller makes coins appear out of a clear tank of water, puts them back in and goldfish magically take their place.While there are some elements of classic magic and sleight of hand in the show, most of the tricks are incredibly creative, innovative and sometimes bordering on the macabre. Teller appears to swallow needles and then a piece of thread. He then proceeds to pull the needles, all neatly threaded together, out of his mouth.Penn, a talented juggler, doesn't use standard objects to showcase his skills - instead he juggles broken liquor bottles and fire.Many of the tricks are accompanied by background music from the talented jazz pianist Mike Jones, which adds another unique touch to the show. If you get to the theater early, you're in for a treat as The Mike Jones Duo performs live music to warm up the crowd. Look closely and you might recognize the tall, mysterious upright bass player in the duo.The culmination of the show is the magic bullet trick where Penn & Teller simultaneously fire guns at each other, through small panes of glass, and then catch the bullets in their mouths. Audience volunteers with gun knowledge are brought up on stage to check the bullets and guns before and after the stunt, confirming its validity.The trick literally ends the show with a bang, leaving the audience wondering how it was pulled off. As Penn explained, it wasn't an easy illusion to create. "We worked on The Double Bullet Catch for a couple of years before we put it in the show and we worked for as long as we could before we ever really pointed a gun. The first step was using a single gun, where just one of us fired at the other. After months of work, it was time for the first tests. We flipped a coin, and I lost. I had to point the gun at Teller first," he said. "It was so hard. Yes, it's a TRICK! Yes, we have so many safety checks in place it's almost stupid, but it was still so, so hard to do. So hard. I was trembling. It's much harder to point a gun at someone than to have a gun pointed at you. It's a trick, no reason to test me on the street. It's not impromptu."It takes a lot of trust to be able to shoot bullets at each other - trust that has built up in Penn & Teller over 30 years of performing together.The two first teamed up in 1975, combining Teller's magic with Penn's juggling and comic expertise, working their way up from the streets to clubs and eventually to Broadway.By 1985, the duo was receiving critical praise for their Off-Broadway show. In 1987, they began the first of two successful Broadway runs and enjoyed national tours throughout the 1990s.They appeared in Las Vegas at Bally's and the MGM Grand before landing a long-term gig in their own spacious theater at the Rio in 2001.Penn & Teller have appeared more than 20 times on "Late Night with David Letterman" and on a variety of other television shows including "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno," "Miami Vice," "Hollywood Squares," "Saturday Night Live" and as animated guests on "The Simpsons."When they aren't busy with their Las Vegas show, Penn & Teller have gotten involved in other creative projects. They are the authors of three best-selling books, "Cruel Tricks for Dear Friends," "How to Play with Your Food" and "How to Play in Traffic."Their latest project, "Penn & Teller: Bulls--t!" for the Showtime television network, is in its fourth season. The show, which has received six Emmy nominations, sets out to debunk myths, rumors and secrets behind popular subjects such as talking to the dead, psychics and alien abductions.Penn credits their longevity and success as a team to keeping their relationship all about work. "It's always been a business relationship. We do better stuff together than we do separately and we love working together. We have become very good friends, of course, but we don't hang out very much."Separating their business and personal lives certainly seems to be a winning formula for Penn & Teller. Their show is constantly evolving as they add new tricks and revamp some older ones. It's one of the smartest shows in town and they certainly live up to their billing as "a couple of eccentric guys who have learned how to do a few cool things."-- By Kristine McKenzie
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatar
fromDenver, Co
Yes, I recommend this product.
Wow, what a show
PostedJanuary 1, 2014
This show was awesome. The tricks they do are amazing and make you wonder how it's possible to do them. Right from the entrance of the show all the way to the end there are awesome tricks. I found that Penn is the taller long hair guy with glasses and teller is the one that don't talk. Although you do hear him talk a bit in the show so he can, it's just he don't. Totally funny the whole time. Even though I was a few rows back I had great seats. After the show you can meet them in person, shake hands, take pictures and all that. Before the show you can get up on stage and check things out. Well worth every penny to go see.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
 
The fabulous feathered headpieces, the rhinestone embellished costumes, the beautiful, long-legged (and topless) showgirls – this is Jubilee.Jubilee is more than a topless revue. It is the only remaining showgirl production in Las Vegas. Choreographer and producer Donn Arden opened the show in 1981, bringing to the stage over-the-top dance numbers and elaborate sets, such as those telling the stories of the sinking of the Titanic and the Bible's Samson and Delilah.The show was reworked in early 2014 by choreographer Frank Gatson Jr., who attempted to stay true to Arden's original vision.Arden made his mark in Vegas when he produced one of the first showgirl production shows, Lido de Paris, for the Las Vegas Strip in 1958.Many of the original elements remained with this latest incarnation, including the grand opening and finale numbers with dozens of Vegas showgirls and showboys descending a grand staircase.The music has been updated, as has the theater's sound system, lending itself to a crisper sound. Although the stellar vocalists are singing to canned music, the sound is decidedly more modern, with a primarily R&B flair.In the new production, the show introduces Miss Jubilee and her glow stick-carrying, faceless companions. An unseen narrator announces that Miss Jubilee must travel back in time because "her rightful place is on the Las Vegas Strip … and her journey (is) to reclaim the night."She travels through the Valley of Sorek, where Samson and Delilah's ill-fated love story takes place, only to make her way onto the equally doomed Titanic "to find true love."Miss Jubilee makes her way to America, where tap dancing showgirls greet her to the tune of "You're a Grand Old Flag." The performers take on energetic dance routines that span American choreography (think swing, tap and hip hop), getting the audience to their feet.Gatson, who is pop superstar Beyoncé's creative director, told Vegas.com he took special care to stay true to Arden's vision, all the while adding new dances and the storyline of Miss Jubilee.-- By Nicole Lucht
 
Overall rating 
2 / 5
2 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
3 / 5
3 / 5
Theater Quality 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Special Effects 
2 / 5
2 / 5
Sound Quality 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Customer avatar
fromDenver, Co
No, I do not recommend this product.
It was decent
PostedJanuary 1, 2014
I went to this show only to see topless girls. When the girls are topless, they are practically nude but not all the girls are topless. The guys at times are also practically nude. If you like broadway type shows then this would be okay to go see. It wasn't my cup of tea. It was something that I can say I saw but won't be back. I had a booth seating, not recommended at all.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
Even if you get covered in popcorn, you won't want to stop the clown from posing as an usher and engaging in some pre-show debauchery with the crowd. With his black suit and disheveled gray hair, he has no problem amusing people. The clown is zany, mischievous and your first exposure to the unknown at Mystère by Cirque du Soleil at Treasure Island. What's ahead is a wondrous world of mystifying creatures who perform a series of incredible acrobatic and gymnastic feats.When Mystère opened in 1993, the show was the first Cirque du Soleil production in Vegas. Emphasizing awe-inspiring athleticism and imaginative imagery, it embraces all of the signature Cirque du Soleil elements that have made the production company a mainstay on the Las Vegas Strip.From rebirth to the pursuit of happiness, each of the characters and acts in Mystère symbolizes something different. They combine to create an overall theme for the show as a celebration of the circle of life. Some audience members may interpret each act as an allegory, but with the innovative costumes and performances, realizing those themes isn't necessary for enjoying this show.What makes Mystère so endearing is that many of the performances are typical circus-style acts like the flying trapeze, an aerialist and the teeterboard, an acrobatic tool where a person jumps on one end of what looks like a seesaw and the person on the other end is launched into the air. However, in Mystère, the boundaries of those disciplines are pushed, creating fantastical routines that you won't see in any other production.For instance, in the hand-to-hand routine, two muscular men demonstrate a series of gravity-defying poses and their incredible strength, but they don't even perform on a flat surface. In Mystère, the men do this while balancing on a rotating dome, adding to the awesomeness of their routine.The Tissu act is another example. In this routine a female aerialist performs while suspending herself with two pieces of fabric hanging from the ceiling. This type of act can be seen in other shows on the Strip, but in Mystère the performer combines contortion, acrobatics and movement in her routine, creating optical illusions that defy imagination.Music played by live musicians and singers drives the show. Mixing elements of everything from rock to Celtic, African and soul music, the soundtrack is just as mysterious as the action on stage.Along with awe-inspiring moments, Mystère offers a hearty does of comedy brought on by the clown "usher" and an adult-sized baby. They appear on stage throughout the show. The clown and baby don’t tell jokes, but their wacky antics and interactions with the audience make people laugh. It's hard not to chuckle when you see a man on stage wearing a diaper and a bonnet.When the comedy segments come to a close, the show quickly changes pace. Once again the audience is sitting in amazement at another thrilling routine. One of these is the Chinese Poles. For this act a group of gymnasts perform on four vertical poles. They crawl, jump and flip up, down and across the poles. Their masks add to the implausibility of their performance. While their bodies face away from the audience, their masks are looking right at them. It seems impossible, but then again, this is Mystère.-- By Caroline Fontein
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatar
fromDenver, Co
Yes, I recommend this product.
Amazing show
PostedJanuary 1, 2014
This show was not only funny but fun to watch. The acrobat skits alone was worth it. Sitting almost the very front was great. Well worth the cost. Next time I will be all the way in front.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
MileHighGuy's Questions
 
MileHighGuy has not submitted any questions.
 
MileHighGuy's Answers
 
The fabulous feathered headpieces, the rhinestone embellished costumes, the beautiful, long-legged (and topless) showgirls – this is Jubilee.Jubilee is more than a topless revue. It is the only remaining showgirl production in Las Vegas. Choreographer and producer Donn Arden opened the show in 1981, bringing to the stage over-the-top dance numbers and elaborate sets, such as those telling the stories of the sinking of the Titanic and the Bible's Samson and Delilah.The show was reworked in early 2014 by choreographer Frank Gatson Jr., who attempted to stay true to Arden's original vision.Arden made his mark in Vegas when he produced one of the first showgirl production shows, Lido de Paris, for the Las Vegas Strip in 1958.Many of the original elements remained with this latest incarnation, including the grand opening and finale numbers with dozens of Vegas showgirls and showboys descending a grand staircase.The music has been updated, as has the theater's sound system, lending itself to a crisper sound. Although the stellar vocalists are singing to canned music, the sound is decidedly more modern, with a primarily R&B flair.In the new production, the show introduces Miss Jubilee and her glow stick-carrying, faceless companions. An unseen narrator announces that Miss Jubilee must travel back in time because "her rightful place is on the Las Vegas Strip … and her journey (is) to reclaim the night."She travels through the Valley of Sorek, where Samson and Delilah's ill-fated love story takes place, only to make her way onto the equally doomed Titanic "to find true love."Miss Jubilee makes her way to America, where tap dancing showgirls greet her to the tune of "You're a Grand Old Flag." The performers take on energetic dance routines that span American choreography (think swing, tap and hip hop), getting the audience to their feet.Gatson, who is pop superstar Beyoncé's creative director, told Vegas.com he took special care to stay true to Arden's vision, all the while adding new dances and the storyline of Miss Jubilee.-- By Nicole Lucht
 

can teenage above 18 watch the show?

can teenage above 18 watch the show?
You need to be at least 21 to see the show. Alcohol is served in the area. If they are 18 then they can see the show on Friday when it's not so adult like.
8 months ago
Customer avatar
by
MileHighGuy
Denver, Co
 
Even if you get covered in popcorn, you won't want to stop the clown from posing as an usher and engaging in some pre-show debauchery with the crowd. With his black suit and disheveled gray hair, he has no problem amusing people. The clown is zany, mischievous and your first exposure to the unknown at Mystère by Cirque du Soleil at Treasure Island. What's ahead is a wondrous world of mystifying creatures who perform a series of incredible acrobatic and gymnastic feats.When Mystère opened in 1993, the show was the first Cirque du Soleil production in Vegas. Emphasizing awe-inspiring athleticism and imaginative imagery, it embraces all of the signature Cirque du Soleil elements that have made the production company a mainstay on the Las Vegas Strip.From rebirth to the pursuit of happiness, each of the characters and acts in Mystère symbolizes something different. They combine to create an overall theme for the show as a celebration of the circle of life. Some audience members may interpret each act as an allegory, but with the innovative costumes and performances, realizing those themes isn't necessary for enjoying this show.What makes Mystère so endearing is that many of the performances are typical circus-style acts like the flying trapeze, an aerialist and the teeterboard, an acrobatic tool where a person jumps on one end of what looks like a seesaw and the person on the other end is launched into the air. However, in Mystère, the boundaries of those disciplines are pushed, creating fantastical routines that you won't see in any other production.For instance, in the hand-to-hand routine, two muscular men demonstrate a series of gravity-defying poses and their incredible strength, but they don't even perform on a flat surface. In Mystère, the men do this while balancing on a rotating dome, adding to the awesomeness of their routine.The Tissu act is another example. In this routine a female aerialist performs while suspending herself with two pieces of fabric hanging from the ceiling. This type of act can be seen in other shows on the Strip, but in Mystère the performer combines contortion, acrobatics and movement in her routine, creating optical illusions that defy imagination.Music played by live musicians and singers drives the show. Mixing elements of everything from rock to Celtic, African and soul music, the soundtrack is just as mysterious as the action on stage.Along with awe-inspiring moments, Mystère offers a hearty does of comedy brought on by the clown "usher" and an adult-sized baby. They appear on stage throughout the show. The clown and baby don’t tell jokes, but their wacky antics and interactions with the audience make people laugh. It's hard not to chuckle when you see a man on stage wearing a diaper and a bonnet.When the comedy segments come to a close, the show quickly changes pace. Once again the audience is sitting in amazement at another thrilling routine. One of these is the Chinese Poles. For this act a group of gymnasts perform on four vertical poles. They crawl, jump and flip up, down and across the poles. Their masks add to the implausibility of their performance. While their bodies face away from the audience, their masks are looking right at them. It seems impossible, but then again, this is Mystère.-- By Caroline Fontein
 

taking a picture

while watching a show could i make a picture of the show.?Or making
movie.?
absolutely not. They check for recording devices.
8 months ago
Customer avatar
by
MileHighGuy