Traveler123
 
 
 
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    2
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  • First review
    July 21, 2013
  • Last review
    July 21, 2013
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  • Average rating
    4.5
 
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    July 21, 2013
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Traveler123's Reviews
 
You have probably seen him on television performing incredible illusions such as making the Statue of Liberty disappear, navigating the rapids of Niagara Falls and flying over the Grand Canyon. Master magician David Copperfield seems to have done it all. His show in Las Vegas is a unique opportunity for audiences to see these larger-than- life illusions performed live and up close in the Hollywood Theater at MGM Grand.Of course he can't exactly re-create all of them, but he demonstrates similar and equally amazing illusions using objects that are more suitable for a stage setting.Copperfield alludes to an illusion he did where he walked through the Great Wall of China and then explains that he is going to re-create that same illusion using a large metal sheet as the indestructible medium through which he will effortlessly pass.The metal sheet is placed on a raised platform, and Copperfield has two audience members come on stage to test it out by walking on it and hitting it with a rubber hammer.Next, he lies under the piece of metal, and four assistants hold a sheet over Copperfield and the platform. The assistants spin the platform around proving to the audience that there is no way out except by going through the metal. First you see just a finger poking through and then, within seconds, he miraculously appears on top of the metal sheet.This is just one of the mind-boggling magic tricks that he performs in the show. As the epitome of master magicians, Copperfield takes his illusions to another level of excitement and awe. Instead of doing the typical box trick where a woman is sliced in half, he locks himself in a box that begins to shrink in size. He smiles at the audience while moving his hands and feet as the box gets so small the entire length of his body has been reduced to mere inches.The box gradually gets bigger and Copperfield hops onto the stage saying, "that's how they made mini me," before moving on to his next illusion. He integrates his casual and comical personality into every act, resulting in laughter from the crowd.Audience interaction is a big part of the show as he incorporates a person picked at random for almost every illusion. You might even see him doing magic right in front of your seat when he performs illusions while standing in the audience. For one illusion he asks a woman to join him in the aisle on the side of the theater. He asks the woman to examine a piece of tissue paper before he rolls it into a ball and makes it levitate and dance along his arm with the tap of a finger.Unlike other magic shows in Las Vegas, Copperfield does not implement flashy showgirls, dancing or over the top production elements to supplement his illusions. His magic has enough of a wow factor on its own.His expertise as a magician dates back to when he was just 12 years old and started performing professionally. That same year he also became the youngest person ever to be admitted to the Society of American Magicians. From there, Copperfield went on to teach a course on magic at New York University when he was 16.During his first year in college, Copperfield starred in the Chicago musical, "The Magic Man," and as a result of the show's success he was selected to host ABC's "The Magic of ABC." From there he was offered his own series of specials with CBS titled "The Magic of David Copperfield." The series has been aired in over 40 countries.His illustrious career has made him a Guinness Book of World Record holder for having 21 Emmys, and he has a star on the Hollywood "Walk of Fame." Apart from his revue in Vegas, he continues to tour, performing sold out shows around the world.His enduring presence as a magician and integration into pop culture and even postage stamps proves that Copperfield's magic has no boundaries.He even demonstrates his ability to predict the future in an act where he gets people from the audience to provide him with different numbers that he later pulls from a box that has been hanging above the stage for the entire show.If just having the numbers on paper is not impressive enough, Copperfield also reveals a cassette tape with a recording of himself reciting the numbers that he plays for the audience. It is an astonishing feat that amazes everyone with the impossibility of it all.-- By Caroline Fontein
 
Overall rating 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatar
fromSan Diego, CA
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Female
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Travel Companions:Spouse
Purchase Frequency:Once a year
Gambler:No
Yes, I recommend this product.
Very entertaining!
PostedJuly 21, 2013
This is a very good show. I felt it was a bit much talking by David Copperfield. I would like to see more illusions, similar to the one with a fan. I was pleased with our seats and enjoyed drinks and snacks. Overall, I would definitely recommend this show.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
There are some basic rules of magic. Never tell your audience how a trick is done. Don't show the audience the preparation for a trick. And never, ever perform the classic cups and balls trick with transparent cups.Penn & Teller manage to break all of these rules and more in their show at the Rio Hotel and Casino.Penn & Teller's edgy show is unlike any other magic production in Las Vegas. The tall, lanky Penn serves as a narrator, providing a running comedic commentary on just about everything they do, while the diminutive Teller provides a lot of the show's action, all without saying a single word. The pair manages to reveal a few tricks of their trade along the way, while turning around and completely stumping you with others.Penn & Teller take some of the mystery out of the aforementioned cups and balls trick - a standard magic act where a magician makes balls pass through the solid bottoms of the cups, jump from one cup to another, or disappear from the cup and appear in other places. They perform the act with see-through plastic cups, allowing the audience to see exactly how it works...or do they? Part of the joke is that during the explanation, they do the trick so quickly, that it makes it pretty difficult to follow.Penn & Teller's show relies heavily on audience interaction. Several audience members are chosen to come up and be part of some tricks and to help confirm the authenticity of others. In one vignette, the trick is actually played on the volunteer while the audience gets to watch. The volunteer is blindfolded while Penn pretends to throw knives at her. Then, again blindfolded, she is tricked into believing she throws knives at Penn.While the audience does get to see behind the scenes during these parts of the show, other tricks the duo performs leave viewers completely mystified. Penn takes the eyeglasses from an audience member and puts them in his pocket. They somehow disappear from his pocket and end up inexplicably on Teller's face, which has been encased in a wooden box the whole time.Teller makes coins appear out of a clear tank of water, puts them back in and goldfish magically take their place.While there are some elements of classic magic and sleight of hand in the show, most of the tricks are incredibly creative, innovative and sometimes bordering on the macabre. Teller appears to swallow needles and then a piece of thread. He then proceeds to pull the needles, all neatly threaded together, out of his mouth.Penn, a talented juggler, doesn't use standard objects to showcase his skills - instead he juggles broken liquor bottles and fire.Many of the tricks are accompanied by background music from the talented jazz pianist Mike Jones, which adds another unique touch to the show. If you get to the theater early, you're in for a treat as The Mike Jones Duo performs live music to warm up the crowd. Look closely and you might recognize the tall, mysterious upright bass player in the duo.The culmination of the show is the magic bullet trick where Penn & Teller simultaneously fire guns at each other, through small panes of glass, and then catch the bullets in their mouths. Audience volunteers with gun knowledge are brought up on stage to check the bullets and guns before and after the stunt, confirming its validity.The trick literally ends the show with a bang, leaving the audience wondering how it was pulled off. As Penn explained, it wasn't an easy illusion to create. "We worked on The Double Bullet Catch for a couple of years before we put it in the show and we worked for as long as we could before we ever really pointed a gun. The first step was using a single gun, where just one of us fired at the other. After months of work, it was time for the first tests. We flipped a coin, and I lost. I had to point the gun at Teller first," he said. "It was so hard. Yes, it's a TRICK! Yes, we have so many safety checks in place it's almost stupid, but it was still so, so hard to do. So hard. I was trembling. It's much harder to point a gun at someone than to have a gun pointed at you. It's a trick, no reason to test me on the street. It's not impromptu."It takes a lot of trust to be able to shoot bullets at each other - trust that has built up in Penn & Teller over 30 years of performing together.The two first teamed up in 1975, combining Teller's magic with Penn's juggling and comic expertise, working their way up from the streets to clubs and eventually to Broadway.By 1985, the duo was receiving critical praise for their Off-Broadway show. In 1987, they began the first of two successful Broadway runs and enjoyed national tours throughout the 1990s.They appeared in Las Vegas at Bally's and the MGM Grand before landing a long-term gig in their own spacious theater at the Rio in 2001.Penn & Teller have appeared more than 20 times on "Late Night with David Letterman" and on a variety of other television shows including "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno," "Miami Vice," "Hollywood Squares," "Saturday Night Live" and as animated guests on "The Simpsons."When they aren't busy with their Las Vegas show, Penn & Teller have gotten involved in other creative projects. They are the authors of three best-selling books, "Cruel Tricks for Dear Friends," "How to Play with Your Food" and "How to Play in Traffic."Their latest project, "Penn & Teller: Bulls--t!" for the Showtime television network, is in its fourth season. The show, which has received six Emmy nominations, sets out to debunk myths, rumors and secrets behind popular subjects such as talking to the dead, psychics and alien abductions.Penn credits their longevity and success as a team to keeping their relationship all about work. "It's always been a business relationship. We do better stuff together than we do separately and we love working together. We have become very good friends, of course, but we don't hang out very much."Separating their business and personal lives certainly seems to be a winning formula for Penn & Teller. Their show is constantly evolving as they add new tricks and revamp some older ones. It's one of the smartest shows in town and they certainly live up to their billing as "a couple of eccentric guys who have learned how to do a few cool things."-- By Kristine McKenzie
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatar
fromSan Diego, CA
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Female
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Travel Companions:Spouse
Purchase Frequency:Once a year
Gambler:No
Yes, I recommend this product.
Excellent show
PostedJuly 21, 2013
It is a very good show. Everyone must see it while in Vegas. One of the best features is meeting Penn and Teller after the show and taking pictures with them.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
Traveler123's Questions
 
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Traveler123's Answers
 
You have probably seen him on television performing incredible illusions such as making the Statue of Liberty disappear, navigating the rapids of Niagara Falls and flying over the Grand Canyon. Master magician David Copperfield seems to have done it all. His show in Las Vegas is a unique opportunity for audiences to see these larger-than- life illusions performed live and up close in the Hollywood Theater at MGM Grand.Of course he can't exactly re-create all of them, but he demonstrates similar and equally amazing illusions using objects that are more suitable for a stage setting.Copperfield alludes to an illusion he did where he walked through the Great Wall of China and then explains that he is going to re-create that same illusion using a large metal sheet as the indestructible medium through which he will effortlessly pass.The metal sheet is placed on a raised platform, and Copperfield has two audience members come on stage to test it out by walking on it and hitting it with a rubber hammer.Next, he lies under the piece of metal, and four assistants hold a sheet over Copperfield and the platform. The assistants spin the platform around proving to the audience that there is no way out except by going through the metal. First you see just a finger poking through and then, within seconds, he miraculously appears on top of the metal sheet.This is just one of the mind-boggling magic tricks that he performs in the show. As the epitome of master magicians, Copperfield takes his illusions to another level of excitement and awe. Instead of doing the typical box trick where a woman is sliced in half, he locks himself in a box that begins to shrink in size. He smiles at the audience while moving his hands and feet as the box gets so small the entire length of his body has been reduced to mere inches.The box gradually gets bigger and Copperfield hops onto the stage saying, "that's how they made mini me," before moving on to his next illusion. He integrates his casual and comical personality into every act, resulting in laughter from the crowd.Audience interaction is a big part of the show as he incorporates a person picked at random for almost every illusion. You might even see him doing magic right in front of your seat when he performs illusions while standing in the audience. For one illusion he asks a woman to join him in the aisle on the side of the theater. He asks the woman to examine a piece of tissue paper before he rolls it into a ball and makes it levitate and dance along his arm with the tap of a finger.Unlike other magic shows in Las Vegas, Copperfield does not implement flashy showgirls, dancing or over the top production elements to supplement his illusions. His magic has enough of a wow factor on its own.His expertise as a magician dates back to when he was just 12 years old and started performing professionally. That same year he also became the youngest person ever to be admitted to the Society of American Magicians. From there, Copperfield went on to teach a course on magic at New York University when he was 16.During his first year in college, Copperfield starred in the Chicago musical, "The Magic Man," and as a result of the show's success he was selected to host ABC's "The Magic of ABC." From there he was offered his own series of specials with CBS titled "The Magic of David Copperfield." The series has been aired in over 40 countries.His illustrious career has made him a Guinness Book of World Record holder for having 21 Emmys, and he has a star on the Hollywood "Walk of Fame." Apart from his revue in Vegas, he continues to tour, performing sold out shows around the world.His enduring presence as a magician and integration into pop culture and even postage stamps proves that Copperfield's magic has no boundaries.He even demonstrates his ability to predict the future in an act where he gets people from the audience to provide him with different numbers that he later pulls from a box that has been hanging above the stage for the entire show.If just having the numbers on paper is not impressive enough, Copperfield also reveals a cassette tape with a recording of himself reciting the numbers that he plays for the audience. It is an astonishing feat that amazes everyone with the impossibility of it all.-- By Caroline Fontein
 

i am in china now. how do i get tickets if i book online now?

If you get tickets on Vegas.com, they will send you an email confirmation with the details how to get tickets. You will pick up your tickets at the box office or MGM concierge the day of the show. Make sure you have your ID with you. Hope this helps. Have fun in Vegas!
1 year ago
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by
Traveler123
San Diego, CA