Apol
 
 
 
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  • Review count
    3
  • Helpfulness votes
    0
  • First review
    June 19, 2013
  • Last review
    June 19, 2013
  • Featured reviews
    0
  • Average rating
    4
 
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  • Answer count
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  • First answer
    June 19, 2013
  • Last answer
    June 19, 2013
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Apol's Reviews
 
Note: Criss Angel Believe will be dark as Criss recovers from shoulder surgery. The show will return April 15.What would a magician do when his act gets mixed reviews for having too much going on and too much filler?He'd make those parts disappear, of course.And in true magical fashion, he makes them re-appear as something much better.The recently revamped Criss Angel Believe from Cirque du Soleil brings out more of what Angel's fans have been clamoring for in the first place: magic.This production has seen some significant changes in response to feedback from guests and critics alike, and the end result is a highly focused and entertaining show.Criss Angel Believe takes his illusions and stage presence, combined with the flair and artistry Cirque is best known for -- with just enough of each to make fans of both happy.Although the magic acts in Criss Angel Believe form a loosely-connected narrative, this story is secondary to wowing the audience with illusions. From levitation to "how'd-he-do-it?" disappearances, Angel brings out all the acts he has made famous on "Mindfreak" and then some, along with some more traditional illusions with an added "Mindfreak" twist to them.From the theater itself to the set pieces used during Angel's performance, the whole atmosphere is dark with gothic accents, reminiscent of old-fashioned circuses and carnivals with a morbid twist.Angel's back-and-forth interaction with the audience throughout the show keeps things interesting, but his bumbling assistants -- four "ushers" named Maestro, Luigi, Slim and Lars --  ensure that the whole experience, from start to finish, inspires both awe and laughter. Expect lots of dark humor, as Angel has snappy commentary to accompany many of his illusions."You're applauding this woman being cut in half. Really, that's horrible. Just horrible," he says with a sarcastic grin, after a scaled-up take on the classic "saw a woman in half" trick. We've never thought about it like that, but Angel generally has an entirely different way of thinking about these illusions than your average magician does.If you've ever wanted to be a part of a larger-than-life, stage version of Angel's "Mindfreak" program -- this is the show to see.-- By Jorge Labrador
 
Overall rating 
3 / 5
3 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
3 / 5
3 / 5
View of Stage 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Theater Quality 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Special Effects 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Sound Quality 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Customer avatarApol
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Male
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Travel Companions:Family
Purchase Frequency:Once every few years
Gambler:No
No, I do not recommend this product.
Disappointed
PostedJune 19, 2013
Show of the local TV asterisk. If you are not an American - better choose another show. The whole audience is basically coming just to see TV celebrity in reality ...
While the "star" itself does not bother to create a professional show and all defects of the show hides by a dazzling fireworks and flames - very unprofessional. Criss is arrogant and quite rudely interact with the audience. Actually there is no Cirque du Soleil in the show (apart from a few "rabbit" brief appearance on stage) - it's very confusing, so not fall on the hook of unfair producer!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
KÀ by Cirque du Soleil at MGM Grand is an action-packed adventure story about Imperial Twins who are separated by an attack on their Far Eastern palace. Unlike other Cirque du Soleil shows in Vegas, this one has a distinguishable plot. The story is exciting, but what really captivates audiences is how it's told.Apart from a brief narrative at the beginning of the show, there is no talking in KÀ. Instead, the plot is conveyed through the performers' actions and an awe-inspiring stage that cost $200 million and took two years to build. In KÀ you see special effects from the silver screen come to life before your eyes. In addition, the show's talented cast includes: gymnasts, martial artists, aerialists, a baton twirler and a specialty act that performers a daring routine on a giant spinning wheel contraption.Just walking into the theater is an experience on its own. As soon as you enter, you are confronted with a postindustrial looking post and beam structure that lines both sides of the theater. Tribal warriors are perched on the structure. Don't be surprised if they suddenly jump out over the audience. The warriors are wearing equipment, allowing them to swing over the audience and back in a matter of seconds.The surrounding stage elements make you feel like you are a part of the set with the action taking place all around you. Throughout the show, the performers enter the stage from the audience. If you are sitting by the aisle you might even see a warrior appear at your side with a bow and arrow in hand, ready for combat.Instead of a traditional stage, the audience sits facing a seemingly bottomless void filled with smoke. The artists enter and exit from above, around and inside the void. They do almost everything, but walk from stage left to stage right like what you would see in any typical production. At KÀ the artists fly through the air or perform on two moving platforms that operate independently of each other and five stage lifts. The artists also perform on the post and beam structure that extends from the stage area over the audience.The ever-evolving performance space transforms into a floating barge, a beach, a snowy mountain and a violent sea in the midst of a storm, among other varied landscapes. The changing platforms mean that the performers and their orientation to the audience is always changing too. The show starts with a twin brother and sister at a celebration before their palace is attacked by evil warriors. While trying to escape, the twins get separated, and they are each forced to embark on an arduous journey to find one another and reclaim their palace.They travel through varied terrain and meet interesting characters who help them along the way. KÀ has all of the expected elaborate production elements of a Cirque du Soleil show, including acrobatics. In one scene, the sister lands in a tropical jungle where the inhabitants jump, flip and fly from swinging vines.While the twins are finding their way, the stage once again transforms into the lair of the evil ruler and his warriors. It is amazing to see the scene instantly change from a beautiful lush forest to a dark, ominous looking hideout.Ultimately, the Imperial twins prevail, and the show ends in a glorious celebration with music, dancing and fireworks. If you've ever dreamed of embarking on a fantastical adventure, then make sure to see KÀ on your next stay in Las Vegas.
 
Overall rating 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatarApol
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Male
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Yes, I recommend this product.
Probably the best show have ever seen
PostedJune 19, 2013
From the entrance to the KA theater until the vary last chord - everything is perfect and complete. My best recommendations and best regards to the show troupe - you're simply the best.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
The disembodied narrators of the Blue Man Group show profess to know a lot about human nature and social evolution, but the three earless, voiceless, black-clad stars are oddly oblivious.Though it deals out a good dose of off-color humor, the show also takes on big issues including brain function, groupthink, artificial intelligence and the loss of language, guiding the audience to its conclusions about society with the same playful force that the trio of mimes uses to harangue guests into participating in the production.Once the floating eyeball blimps finish their pre-show course around the theater and silent scrolling text has mocked a few of your fellow audience members, be prepared to have a bright blue hand sift through your personal belongings and to hear a booming voice insinuate that your iPhone is making you less human. It's all part of the fun.Blue Man Group sprinkles its show with kid-friendly variety acts and quick-change illusions, but the core of its appeal is the company's signature music, played on fantastical invented instruments. Lighting and special effects bolster the effect of the beats, but Blue Man Group is not a show with a soundtrack — it's a soundtrack with a show.Before the show each night, the trio leads the way to the theater with a centipede-like procession of actors and instruments that worms through the Monte Carlo and into the Blue Man Group lair. If  you follow, you'll be in for a strange and scintillating show.
 
Overall rating 
4 / 5
4 / 5
Customer service 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Accuracy of VEGAS.com's Description 
5 / 5
5 / 5
View of Stage 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Theater Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Special Effects 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Sound Quality 
5 / 5
5 / 5
Customer avatarApol
Age:45 to 54
Gender:Male
Travel Purpose:Vacation/Pleasure
Travel Companions:Family
Purchase Frequency:Once every few years
Gambler:No
Yes, I recommend this product.
Stylish, professional and funny
PostedJune 19, 2013
Except for a few parts in the middle of the show (eg., robotics nomination), this show is funny and very original - surely it will brighten your mood and accompany you with a smile on your face after the show.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
 
Apol's Questions
 
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Apol's Answers
 
The disembodied narrators of the Blue Man Group show profess to know a lot about human nature and social evolution, but the three earless, voiceless, black-clad stars are oddly oblivious.Though it deals out a good dose of off-color humor, the show also takes on big issues including brain function, groupthink, artificial intelligence and the loss of language, guiding the audience to its conclusions about society with the same playful force that the trio of mimes uses to harangue guests into participating in the production.Once the floating eyeball blimps finish their pre-show course around the theater and silent scrolling text has mocked a few of your fellow audience members, be prepared to have a bright blue hand sift through your personal belongings and to hear a booming voice insinuate that your iPhone is making you less human. It's all part of the fun.Blue Man Group sprinkles its show with kid-friendly variety acts and quick-change illusions, but the core of its appeal is the company's signature music, played on fantastical invented instruments. Lighting and special effects bolster the effect of the beats, but Blue Man Group is not a show with a soundtrack — it's a soundtrack with a show.Before the show each night, the trio leads the way to the theater with a centipede-like procession of actors and instruments that worms through the Monte Carlo and into the Blue Man Group lair. If  you follow, you'll be in for a strange and scintillating show.
 

Are cameras allowed in the show?

No
9 months ago
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Apol